Sean's Stories

Posted by sean on March 8, 2019 at 11:36 pm in Cooking with No Comments


What is this new obsession with ‘Mac and Cheese’? It’s suddenly appeared everywhere, presumably from the same ‘Book of Fake Fads’ as Veganism.

A quick note on this (before the International Vegan Society perform a DoS attack on my blog). I have nothing against vegans. In fact, as somebody who turned vegetarian last year, for animal welfare, I applaud you. Those poor individuals who are forced to become a vegan, due to food intolerance problems, also have my respect and sympathy.

The vegans I take issue with are those who are doing it as a fad or to make a statement. The people who decide to turn vegan in the summer, but give up as soon as mummy’s famous turkey comes out of the oven at Christmas… grrr!

Worse are the vegans, who say things like “I’m a vegan, but I do eat dairy cheese on pizzas. It’s my guilty pleasure!”. It’s like veggies who eat fish – you’re not a vegetarian, you’re a pescatarian. Oh, and don’t even get me started on the stupid phrase “guilty pleasure” – that’s for another day! Vegans who eat cheese on pizza are called vegetarians. Let’s face it, if they have cheese, they probably have pepperoni, which will make them an omnivore.

If only Fred West had seen this sign…

Where on earth am I going with this? OK, to summarise, vegans are great, as are veggies, but ONLY if you stick to your choice of diet FOREVER – and just to clarify, FOREVER does not mean until the BBQ season, or when McDonald’s bring back the McRib sandwich. FOREVER means until the day you die.

Considering this blog post was originally meant to be about Mac and Cheese, I have digressed terribly…

This is what this blog was supposed to have been about!

Lots of people seem to be going on about M&C. You see recipes for it in magazines; you see idiotic celebrities, like Robbie Savage, attempting to make it on cooking TV shows; and when you look at restaurant menus, “MAC AND CHEESE” is commonly listed. I was in Asda on Tuesday, when some child shouted out “Guess what we’re eating later? Mac and Cheese!’.

As far as I was aware, M&C is simply Macaroni Cheese. This is a delicious dish, made with macaroni (although I’ve often seen it done with pasta tubes) and thick, creamy cheese sauce. My parents often made it for me and it was my favourite meal as a child. Considering I’m 37 next week, you work out how long ago that was! As an adult, I continue to regularly enjoy the meal.

Even my own mother suggested I try M&C, as “so many people are going on about it”. Does she not realise she was cooking it for me, some 30+ years ago?

Where has this M&C rubbish come from? I have my suspicions. I may be wrong, but it stinks of Americanisation and another example of the British adopting one of their terms. I blame Donald Trump.

If I ever hear the words “Mac and Cheese” used, after I have eaten “Macaroni Cheese”, I will immediately vomit my recently consumed meal, all over the offender – just like that racist Women’s Institute lady from Little Britain.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

No trackbacks yet.

Posts with similar tags

No post with similar tags yet.

Posts in similar categories

  • About Me

    So you stumbled across my blog. No doubt after searching for something bizarre on Google. Before you hit that 'Back Button', why not stay and have a read for a few minutes?

    If you are after a website which gives advice on how to hack an iPhone X, download the latest Steven Seagal movie, or view nudy ladies, you've come to the wrong place and may now press 'Back'.

    However, if you would like a lifestyle blog, written by a 30-something chap, living in Bath (England), feast your eyes on this.

    You won't discover how to copy PlayStation 4 games. What you will find is a blog, covering life in the West Country, the highs and lows of supporting two unsuccessful football teams, while sharing a house with a wife and rabbit.

    All written by a man, somewhere on the sanity-scale between normal and eccentric.
  • Archives